Tools and Supplies to Install a Door Stopper

Before you start installing your door stopper, you need to know which one is right for your home. There are two different kinds to choose from:

  • Hinge-mounted door stoppers
  • Fixed post door stoppers

Hinge-mounted stoppers fit inside of the hinge of your door frame. They don’t require any drilling, which is why so many homeowners prefer this type. However, they stick out a little bit more to prevent slamming from the inside. The bulky appearance might not be something that bothers you, but it’s worth checking out.

Fixed post stoppers require you to measure and drill into the wall and the door. If you don’t want to damage your house or you’re not allowed to due to rental agreements, then you’ll probably be forced to use a different style. However, the concealed appearance and longevity of fixed post door stoppers makes them a top choice for many people.

After you’ve chosen the type of door stopper that you want to purchase, you’ll need to get the rest of your supplies. Here’s a quick list to run through in order to make sure that you’re ready to get the job started:

  • A pencil and an eraser (you’ll need to be able to remove the mark)
  • The door stopper of your choosing
  • A power drill
  • Drill bits to match the screws that came with the post (if it’s a fixed stopper)
  • A flathead screwdriver (if it’s a hinge-mounted stopper)

Get everything laid out and ready to go once you’ve pulled it together. Remember that you only need a flathead screwdriver if you’re working on a hinge-mounted stopper. Everything else is only required if you want to install a fixed post stopper. The breakdown of each is simple, so let’s jump into the details in the next section.

Other Tools

  • Screwdriver
  • Hammer
  • Tape measure
  • Pen or pencil
  • Pry bar
  • Utility knife
  • Putty knife
  • Miter box and saw
  • Paint brush
  • Scrap wood
  • Air compressor
  • Air hose

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Step 12

After the new door trim repair is secured with the nails, use the putty knife and wood filler to cover up the holes. Touch up any areas needed with paint.

After the new door trim repair is secured with the nails, use the putty knife and wood filler to cover up the holes. Touch up any areas needed with paint.

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Common Mistakes

Although the installation is fairly straightforward, there are multiple complications that can lead to big issues down the road. If you’re not mechanically inclined, you don’t need to worry; This section is designed to help you avoid common mistakes that we’ve all had to deal with along the way.

Here are the most frequent installation mishaps:

  • Trying to get away without using tools will never work. If you don’t hammer the bolts down on a hinge-mounted stopper, the door will loosen up and fall down. You’ll also have to deal with a dangling stopper that doesn’t do its job. Never try to take the quickest route; It’s already fast enough!
  • Don’t drill too far inward on a hollow door. The reason that 1.5 inches is the designated measurement is that you could potentially punch a hole right through the door with your pilot hole. Hollow doors aren’t meant to take a beating, so never drill beyond 1.5 inches away from the edges.
  • Always drill pilot holes before you start. If you try to screw the fixed poster stopper in the wall or your door without making a pilot hole, you’ll either ruin the stopper or the surface. Stripped screws, cracked wood, and chipped paint are a few of the possibilities of neglecting to use drill bits.
  • Remember to line up the door parallel to the wall before making a mark. Eyeballing the job will result in all sorts of problems. You’ll end up with a result that’s a combination of each of the issues above. Take a few extra seconds to get everything down correctly before proceeding to the next step.

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Step by Step Guide of Installing a Hinge- Mounted Doorstop

Hinge pin door stop is the best option to install on your door. Unlike the other door stopper types, it is easy to install and works great to prevent the door from touching the wall. Installing it on your door will keep your walls safe from scuffs.

Step 1. Get the Right Hinge Mounted Doorstop

Before you start any work, get the best hinge pin

Before you start any work, get the best hinge pin door stop in any hardware store. A good Hinge pin door stopper has a compact metal body, metal ring, and two rubber pads.

Step 2. Remove the Hinge Pin on The Door

Shut the door and remove the pins on the upper hin

Shut the door and remove the pins on the upper hinge with a flat-head screwdriver. If you want to use this tool, push the screwdriver into the flared head of the pin and pry it out.

Step 3. Attach the Hinge Pin with the Doorstop

From the top of the doorstop, push in the hinge pi

From the top of the doorstop, push in the hinge pin until it gets to the hole underneath. Then use gentle movements to rotate the pin on the hinge. With this action, the stopper stays on the hinge and keeps the pin in position. Complete this stage by hitting the pin into the hinge with a hammer

Step 4: Adjust the Doorstop to Desired Opening Distance

With the pin well-secured, rotate the threaded rod

With the pin well-secured, rotate the threaded rod of the stopper’s adjustable pad to determine how the door will open. You can use your fingers or the flat-headed screwdriver to make the adjustment.

If you add more turns, the door comes to stopper faster when you open it. As with the other types of door stoppers, open the door to test the device. If it doesn’t get to the right distance, you can adjust it again.

Install Doorstops

Follow these tips to install a spring-loaded or fixed-post doorstop to your baseboard. This will prevent doors from opening too far and damaging your walls.

  • Step 1: Mark the Spot

    Starting at the bottom of the door where it swings into the baseboard, measure about 2″ in from the edge of the door along the baseboard. Using a pencil, mark a spot equidistant from the top and bottom of the baseboard. This is where you will install the doorstop.

  • Step 2: Attach the Stop

    Depending on the stop, you’ll either have to screw the shaft of the stop directly into the wall or use separate screws to attach it to the baseboard. You may want to drill a 1/8″ hole where you’ll screw in the doorstop so that the screw won’t crack the baseboard.

    You’re done! You’ve given your walls an understated makeover and the doorstops you’ve installed will keep your walls protected and looking great.

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